Dog training academy teaches how to have a happy canine when you can no longer work from home | Illawarra Mercury

Community, dog, dogs, animal, animals, COVID-19, coronavirus

An Illawarra dog training academy, which has grown rapidly after the initial COVID lockdown in Shellharbour, is about to open its second facility in Wollongong. Walky’s Dog Training Academy wants to be more accessible to families and their furry friends. And will open a Unanderra training academy on August 2nd. Just in time for the start, the growing team of trainers took on the challenge of rescuing 10,000 dogs from animal shelters and euthanasia in this financial year. READ ALSO: Wollongong Employer Grants Employees Paid Time Off And A $ 100 Gift Card For Each COVID Infection Since the COVID pandemic began, Walkys owner and head coach Nath Morrison has seen a dramatic increase in the number of dogs the need collaborative and accessible training techniques. Mr. Morrison uses a three-step training program to give more dogs the chance to live happily ever after. He said as more people started working from home, the natural desire for company and distraction led to a rise in the price of puppies and an influx of dogs into homes. But when pet owners returned to work, separation anxiety, reactivity, and bad habits began to emerge among their four-legged friends. He said that when the behavior of once well behaved dogs changed, many unfortunately ended up in animal shelters or had to be relocated. Mr Morrison’s goal is to prevent this from happening with every lockdown. In this way, he teaches dog owners to communicate more effectively with their pets. He knows well that it can prevent bad habits and behaviors from developing. Walkys also offers structured day care, which allows owners to relax knowing that their dog is in safe hands and won’t develop bad habits. “We introduced this as an inexpensive way for people to stimulate and exercise their dogs in a controlled and calm environment,” he said. “This way we can offer walks that include exercise and socializing. It allows dogs to reduce their responsiveness in the real world. Walkys also has a Facebook page that gives customers access to all of the trainers, a free podcast, and monthly events like pack walks with other members of the community, in partnership with local animal shelters and animal rescue services, he hopes to provide guidance to people adopting a dog give so that they get on the right paw. “Most people have big intentions rescuing or adopting from a shelter. But shelter dogs can test your patience and need more love and care when introduced to new environments,” he said. “We want to help everyone to do our part to get off to the best possible start with skills designed to encourage calmness and joy and encourage dogs. ” Mr Morrison started Walkys on his own by visiting dog owners’ homes. But after the initial lockdown, he was so busy helping people with COVID dogs that he opened the first training academy and structured daycare center on Lake Illawarra. It started with himself and two co-workers, but the growing number of people wanting help with the dogs after returning to work quickly grew his team to 10. Mr Morrison said demand for dogs during last year’s lockdown meant many had to be sourced from outside the area, and that “when people couldn’t get dogs and the waiting list for purebred puppies exploded into nearly a year” started the rescue dogs, dogs from animal shelters in the west and other countries entirely, t kind of animal came to the suburbs, “he said. “Many come from farms and are highly motivated. As an owner, you really have to know what you’re doing and be a really active person to be able to give them what they need. ”Mr. Morrison, a former veterinarian who studied dog behavior and psychology, started Shoalhaven Animal Rescue and other boutique dog rescue services and foster homes work together to assist with relocation. “People have good intentions and it feels great to house a dog, but we just have to make sure the dogs fit in so they don’t come back,” he said. Read more: We depend on subscription income to support our journalism. If you are able, please log in here. If you are already a subscriber, thank you for your support.

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Pet communication during COVID: Nath Morrison and Liv Javier are preparing for the opening of the second Walkys Dog Training Academy in Illawarra near Unanderra.  Images: Sylvia Liber.

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An Illawarra dog training academy, which has grown rapidly after the initial COVID lockdown in Shellharbour, is about to open its second facility in Wollongong.

Walky’s Dog Training Academy wants to be more accessible to families and their furry friends. And will open a Unanderra training academy on August 2nd.

Just in time for the start, the growing team of trainers took on the challenge of rescuing 10,000 dogs from animal shelters and euthanasia in this financial year.

Since the beginning of the COVID pandemic, Walkys owner and head coach Nath Morrison has seen a dramatic increase in the number of dogs in need of collaborative and accessible training techniques.

Mr. Morrison uses a three-step training program to give more dogs the chance to live happily ever after.

He said as more people started working from home, the natural desire for company and distraction led to a rise in the price of puppies and an influx of dogs into homes.

But when pet owners returned to work, separation anxiety, reactivity, and bad habits began to emerge among their four-legged friends.

He said that when the behavior of once well behaved dogs changed, many unfortunately ended up in animal shelters or had to be relocated.

Mr Morrison’s goal is to prevent this from happening with every lockdown. In this way, he teaches dog owners to communicate more effectively with their pets. He knows well that it can prevent bad habits and behaviors from developing.

Walkys also offers structured day care, which allows owners to relax knowing that their dog is in safe hands and won’t develop bad habits.

“We introduced this as an inexpensive way for people to stimulate and exercise their dogs in a controlled and calm environment,” he said.

“This way we can offer walks that include exercise and socializing. It enables dogs to reduce their responsiveness in the real world. “

Walkys also has a Facebook page that gives customers access to all of the trainers, a free podcast, and monthly events like Pack Walks with other members of the community.

Mr Morrison said by working with local animal shelters and animal rescue services, he hopes to provide guidance to people adopting a dog to help them get on the right paw.

“Most people have big intentions when rescuing or adopting from a shelter. But shelter dogs can test your patience and need more love and care when introduced to new environments,” he said.

“We want to help everyone do their part to get off to the best possible start with skills designed to engage and nurture calm and happy dogs.”

Mr Morrison started Walkys on his own by visiting dog owners’ homes. But after the initial lockdown, he was so busy helping people with COVID dogs that he opened the first training academy and structured daycare center on Lake Illawarra.

It all started with him and two employees, but with the increasing number of people who want help with the dogs after returning to work, his team quickly grows to 10.

Mr Morrison said the demand for dogs during last year’s lockdown meant many had to be sourced from outside the area, increasing the need for training.

“When people couldn’t get dogs and the waiting list for purebred puppies went well for nearly a year, rescue operations began moving dogs from animal shelters in the west and a very different type of animal came to the suburbs,” he said.

“Many come from farms and are highly motivated. As an owner, you really have to know what you’re doing and be a really active person to be able to give them what they need. “

Mr Morrison, a former veterinarian who studied dog behavior and psychology, has started working with Shoalhaven Animal Rescue and other boutique dog rescue services and foster homes to help them move.

“People have good intentions and it feels great to house a dog, but we just have to make sure the dogs fit in so they don’t come back,” he said.

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