Paducah hospitals offer ‘puppy love’ to health care workers amid stressful times | Newsletter Stories

Baptist Health Paducah and Mercy Health Lourdes brought dogs to help relieve stress on their staff.

Laughter could be heard from across the room. Due to the growing number of COVID cases, we wouldn’t hear much about it right now.

PADUCAH– Dogs love unconditionally, and this unconditional puppy love has proven mental health benefits.

Baptist Health Paducah and Mercy Health Lourdes brought dogs to help relieve stress on their staff.

Laughter could be heard from across the room. Due to the growing number of COVID cases, we wouldn’t hear much about it right now.



dog

A Baptist Health Paducah employee holds a Bernedoodle in the break room.

Stacey Young, director of patient relations at Baptist Health, brought Bernedoodle puppies to lighten the mood.

Baptist Health Nurse Manager of Surgery Carla Oliver was delighted.

“It gives us a little chance to think about something else for a while and it helps us with the stress we deal with every day,” said Oliver.

Young said this had been the case for three months with various puppy litters.

The organizer said the Bernedoodle pups were from Calvert City breeder Polly’s Special Bernedoodles.

They made their way through the hospital and lit faces in dark times.

“I’ve seen with my own eyes how hard the people work, despite what’s going on in the community, and they still give 100 percent,” said Young.

“So in my department, the least we can do is spend the day dragging puppies around to give them some love.”



Nelson

Pictures of Nelson visiting health care worker at Mercy Health Lourdes.


Mercy Health Lourdes brought in “Love on a leash” Therapy dog ​​and love bug, Nelson.

The hospital’s foundation director said staff are enjoying their visits.

“One of our nurses even exclaimed when he came around the corner, ‘This is better than pizza!'” Said Torren.

“She really enjoyed having a therapy dog ​​visit.”

His owner, Kerrie Peck, said dogs have a way of showing affection that helps after a long day at work.

“When you make eye contact with them, it just releases a lot of feelings, hormones, just a lot of good feelings.”



Nelson

Nelson is located in Mercy Health Lourdes in Paducah.

Young said it is important for health workers to have such programs, but encourages other facilities to look for therapeutic practices that best suit their facilities.

“This is a health facility, so infection control guidelines must be followed. People must wash their hands before and after working with Nelson, use hand sanitizer, and not get too much fur on their scrubs,” Young said.

“So we have to follow all of these rules and by all means work with your infection control teams, and then it’s definitely a way to brighten the day and bring a smile to your team.”

Some of the visits took place during Healthcare Heroes Appreciation Week in Kentucky. It ran from August 22nd to 28th.

Both hospitals said they will do this for as long as their health workers need.

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